Playlists

Stay Connected With the Music We Love!

Selections for October 16, 2020

Ireland has a vibrant cultural influence outside of the annual St. Patrick’s Day celebrations in March, and this week we’re delving into some topical but less typical connections. We generated a few paragraphs as we did our explorations, so here are links to some music of peace and reflection that you might like to listen to, as you sail with us into the continuum of American-Irish connections.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page

  • Filleadh: Sacred Songs by brothers Owen and Mícheál Pádraig (also known as Moley – an Irish musician who lived in Seattle) Ó Súilleabháin
  • Celtic Soul by their mother, Nóirín Ní Riain
  • Rhiannon Giddens (an American musician who lives in Ireland)


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page 

  • Filleadh: Sacred Songs by brothers Owen and Mícheál Pádraig (also known as Moley – an Irish musician who lived in Seattle) Ó Súilleabháin
  • Celtic Soul by their mother, Nóirín Ní Riain
  • Rhiannon Giddens (an American musician who lives in Ireland)

VIDEOS:

Let’s start in the USA, with a description from Rochester University of recently rediscovered sheet music for a song honoring Frederick Douglass, who was a former slave, and a campaigner against slavery and for the rights of women. The “ Farewell Song of Frederick Douglass” was composed to mark Frederick’s 1845 escape to Ireland, where he traveled for nineteen months and was a huge hit and influential speaker. In September, the Irish Government established the Frederick Douglass Global Fellowships Ireland, to commemorate the 175th anniversary of Frederick Douglass in Ireland.

Ireland was at that time entering the terrible Great Potato Famine, which lasted until 1849. The Famine was one of the drivers behind Ireland’s strong presence in the USA today, as starvation and poverty forced millions of Irish to emigrate. Over 600,000 people (those who survived the journey) landed at the Port of New York between 1846 and 1851, and as emigration continued, an estimated 4.5 million Irish had arrived in America by 1930.

As a reminder of how communities can help one another throughout time, in 1847 the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma sent what money they could – $5,000 in modern money, despite having just survived their own deprivations – over to the starving Irish. In 2020, Irish people raised 1.8 million dollars for Navajo and Hopi people badly affected by COVID-19. The Choctaw Ireland Scholarship supports a student from the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma to attend University College Cork for a one year Master’s degree, in commemoration of the act of generosity and humanitarianism by the Choctaw Nation.

 

Selections for October 9, 2020

This week we take a listen to the music of Ravi Shankar. Not only was he a Grammy-winning sitar virtuoso, but he was one of the first to bring the magic of Indian music to western audiences. Shankar collaborated with musicians of all genres from the 1960s until his death in 2012. Many musicians cite him as a direct influence on their music.

Some of these notable artists include Yehudi Menuhin, George Harrison, John Coltrane and Philip Glass. Exploring Shankar’s music—and the music created from his influence—is fun because it’s a journey across all types of artists and genres.

Shankar not only played the sitar, but experienced music as something much deeper. He said,

“Music transcends all languages and barriers and is the most beautiful communicative skill one can have. Music makes us all experience different emotions or the Navarasa as we call it. Different types of music, whether it is vocal or instrumental, Eastern or Western, classical or pop or folk from any part of the world can all be spiritual if it has the power to stir the soul of a person and transcend time for the moment.”

Anoushka Shankar, his daughter, is a master sitar player in her own right. She continues the tradition of musical collaboration across cultures and musical genres. This year, Ravi Shankar would’ve been 100 years old. This article pays tribute to his mastery and influence. It features this video by his daughter, Anoushka.

These videos and playlists give you just a small sampling of his sitar artistry. You could easily spend hours following the thread of his music and music from artists that were captivated by his passion.

VIDEOS:
Ravi Shankar teaches George Harrison to play sitar
Ravi Shankar and Yehudi Menuhin
Anoushka Shankar plays Lasya
Anoushka Shankar and Patricia Kopatchinskja play Raga Piloo
Ravi Shankar Tenth Decade in Concert
Ravi Shankar centenary video


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
Early Music Seattle: Ravi Shankar Music


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page 
Early Music Seattle: Ravi Shankar Music

Selections for October 2, 2020

Research into lesser-known composers is being carried out by many hard-working people, including Early Music America and the Rachel Barton Pine Foundation – meaning that a growing number of these gorgeous works can be shared with the world (and more easily than ever before. When technology works, it is awesome!) Thanks to Early Music America for their listing of BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) composers active before 1850 from which we include a sampling below, along with links to videos for your enjoyment!

Vicente Lusitano
Motets for 5-8 voices a capella, from 16th-century Portugal
Vicente Lusitano • Heu me Domine – by Cantum Mensurable

José Maurício Nunes Garcia
Mostly choral; also opera and symphonic works, from 18th-century Brazil
José Maurício Nunes Garcia – Missa de Santa Cecília – by Musica Brasilis

Domingos Caldas Barbosa
Brazilian modinha composer, from 18th-century Brazil
Morrendo Devagar – Domingos Caldas Barbosa (1738_1800) – by Átila Rafael

Charles Ignatius Sancho
Songs and keyboard pieces, from 18th-century England
Ignatius Sancho Minuets – by Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra

Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges
Operas, symphonies, violin concertos, string quartets, duos for two violins, sonatas for keyboard and violin, sonata for harp and flute, from 18th-century France
Buskaid – Symphonie Concertante in G major – Allegro – Chevalier de Saint-George – by Buskaid South Africa

Blas Tardío de Guzmán
Maestro de capilla at Sucre Cathedral (then called La Plata), from 18th-century Bolivia
Tota pulchra es Maria- BLAS TARDÍO DE GUZMÁN – by Enrique Guerrero

Pedro Ximénez Abril Tirado
Chapel master at the Cathedral in Sucre, Bolivia. Considered the post prolific composer of the classical and early romantic periods in South America, from 18th-century Bolivia
Luis Malca Contreras – Minueto 75 Pedro Ximenez Abril – by Luis Malca Contreras for Guitarras de Luthier

Selections for September 25, 2020

From September 15th to October 15th is National Hispanic Heritage Month – Mes Nacional de la Herencia Hispana – in the United States, and this week we are continuing to enjoy some musical fruits of this heritage, paying tribute to three composers who were active in Mexico during the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Disfruten!

  • Antonio de Salazar (1650-1715)
  • Manuel de Zumaya (1678-1755)
  • Ignacio de Jerusalem (1707-1769)

At this time in history, what is now Mexico was called New Spain, because the country didn’t gain independence until 1821. These composers have one large musical influence in common: they were all cathedral chapel masters (also called choir masters). So many (but not necessarily all) of their compositions were designed to be sung by a choir in church.

Antonio de Salazar – Born in Spain around 1650, he then traveled to Mexico. In 1679, he became the chapel master of Puebla Cathedral located in Puebla, about 83 miles from Mexico City. He then became the chapel master of the Mexico City Cathedral, his final position. His work includes magnificats, hymns, responsories, and other sacred choral music as well as villancicos.

Manuel de Zumaya – Born in Mexico around 1678, he was assistant to Antonio de Salazar who was then the chapel master at Mexico City Cathedral. In 1715, Zumaya became the chapel master of the cathedral when Salazar retired. He held that post for 24 years until he left for Oaxaca in 1738 where he held the same position at Oaxaca Cathedral. He composed several masses, a lamentation, and numerous motets as well as villancicos. He’s considered a master of the older Renaissance style as well as of the modern Baroque style.

Ignacio de Jerusalem – Born in Italy in 1707, he emigrated to Mexico City in 1742. He became chapel master of the Metropolitan Cathedral there in 1750, a position he held for the rest of his life. Jerusalem was a prolific composer, and his works include may liturgical pieces such as masses, matins, and magnificats as well as symphonies and other secular music.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page 
Early Music Seattle: Renaissance and Baroque Composers of Mexico


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page 
Early Music Seattle: Renaissance and Baroque Composers of Mexico

Selections for September 11, 2020

In a previous Clef Notes we explored the works of Joseph Bologne, Le Chevalier de Saint-Georges, an Afro-French composer from the time of Mozart – and there are many great composers of African descent (just a few are listed here). When the world discovered Africa’s own magnificent traditions, Art and Culture started resonating with African influences: just looking at a few historical examples, Camille Saint-Saëns was influenced by folk melodies while visiting North Africa, and composed ” Suite algérienne,” Opus 89 ” Africa” and other works in response. In the nineteenth century, Antonín Dvořák incorporated Afro-American themes into his ” New World Symphony.

In the early twentieth century, Artist Pablo Picasso and his Modernist contemporaries were thrilled by African masks and sculpture that they saw at the Musée d’Ethnographie (now the Musée de l’Homme) in Paris, and created paintings and sculptures in hommage. Today we say that artists and musicians should reference their sources, as their due, however Picasso has been quoted as saying, “Good artists copy; great artist steal.” Whatever our modern perspective, it remains true that imitation has always been a form of flattery – and there is so much to admire in the vast history of music from Africa.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
Early Music Seattle: African classical traditions


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page 
Early Music Seattle: African classical traditions

Selections for September 4, 2020

Handpan music defies classification, as evidenced by the many labels it has on streaming services: worldwide, new age, alternative, electronic, etc. Whether it’s played solo or with other instruments, this drum provides a somewhat ethereal quality to any music. It’s the perfect background music.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
Early Music Seattle: Handpan Music


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page 
Early Music Seattle: Handpan Music

Selections for August 28, 2020

Regular readers of Clef Notes will know that we’re fans of multi-cultural music, and how a cross-over of influences between regions, eras and disciplines can help us to hear in new ways. We love how music is a living language what sends its “genes” down the years to future generations. This week we’re once again (as so often) listening deeply to Wu Man, soloist with the exquisite Pipa instrument, and the musical influences around her. We started by listening to Wu Man playing on a track named “In C” on her Spotify station, and noticed that it sounded a little like a Philip Glass composition and also that the piece had been written by Terry Riley (who did indeed influence Philip Glass) and is a cross-heritage composer who includes Classical and Jazz music in his repertoire. If proof were needed that we are all connected, here it is. We hope you enjoy going down “Alice in Wonderland’s rabbit burrow” while exploring music and its influences with us – and if you ever have questions or suggestions, do please drop us a line!


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
Wu Man


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page 
Wu Man

Selections for August 21, 2020

The fabulous Rachel Barton Pine is a prolific concert violinist. She’s known not only for playing the classical greats but also contemporary works. This week’s playlist reflects that range with selections from her two most recent albums:

  • Dvořák and Khachaturian Violin Concertos (2019)
  • Blues Dialogues: Music by Black Composers (2018)

Collaboration is the thread that weaves through all Rachel Barton Pine’s music. Whether she’s playing with symphonies, guest conductors, or other musicians, each song is a team effort. There’s so much that can be said about her music, but better than any description is to experience it!


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
Early Music Seattle: Rachel Barton Pine Music


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page
Early Music Seattle: Rachel Barton Pine Music

Selections for August 14, 2020

This week we’re excited to share playlists devoted to the medieval Hurdy Gurdy instrument, also known as the Wheel fiddle or the Wheel vielle. The player, called a hurdy-gurdist, creates music by turning a crank that rotates a wheel against the strings, while pressing keys on the underside of the instrument to play the tune. Yes, that does sound complicated! The deep sound is similar to bagpipes, although – apologies to our bagpipers out there – much less likely to wake the neighbors. The instrument shows up in contemporary music (read about recordings featuring the Hurdy Gurdy here), and contributes a lot to video game sound tracks (read more here). Fair warning, you might get addicted to the sound.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
Early Music Seattle: Hurdy Gurdy music


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page
Early Music Seattle: Hurdy Gurdy music

Selections for August 7, 2020

When you think of early music, you might think about music played a few hundred years ago, maybe 400 years ago. But imagine music and instruments from at least 1,000 years ago! Such is the case with the yidaki and bilma, or didgeridoo and clap sticks. Playing contemporary songs with these ancient instruments, this week’s playlist features Bärra West Wind, an aboriginal band from northern Australia.

Like all the best bands to come out of Arnhem Land, Bärra West Wind are guided by and bound to their ancient musical traditions, their songlines, their law and their land. Bärra (bah-rra) is the name of a songline belonging to the Gälpu Clan, telling the story of the West Wind. It is from this songline that the band take their name, their inspiration, and their power.

Larry Larrtjaŋga Gurruwiwi and Andrew Gäyalaŋa Gurruwiwi, sons of world-renown custodian of the Yidakki (didgeridoo) Djalu Gurruwiwi and master musicians in their own right, lead this band of monster talents. In their element on stage, Bärra West Wind expertly intertwine the ancient and contemporary in a mesmerizing performance, championing the sounds of saltwater reggae combined with their deep gospel overtones.

The didgeridoo is a long, tubular instrument, typically made from Eucalyptus. It’s the world’s oldest wind instrument. When you play a didgeridoo, the sound is made from the lips and how you blow into it – it has no reeds or finger holes. Clap sticks are also made out of hard Eucalyptus wood. When you play them, you strike them against each other. Like many ancient instruments, the didgerdoo and clap sticks were (and continue to be) an integral part of ceremonial song and dance.

You’ll hear both the didgeridoo and clap sticks in many of the songs of Bärra West Wind. To learn more about them, check out this Facebook Q&A video. To learn more about Aboriginal Australians and the culture, take a look at this video and this page.

Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
Early Music Seattle: Bärra West Wind


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page
Early Music Seattle: Bärra West Wind

Selections for July 31, 2020

As we conclude the For All Our Sisters series, our playlist focuses on Nathan Whittaker. Nathan is a teacher and international violoncello performer on period instruments – he plays a cello of Mario Gadda from 1957, and a baroque cello of Johann Christian Ficker II from c. 1770. In 2012 Nathan gained a Doctorate of Musical Arts from the University of Washington, and also holds degrees from Indiana University. Nathan is – among many other things – serving as Artistic Director of Gallery Concerts Seattle, a group founded with the admirable mission of “presenting Early Music for chamber ensemble in acoustically appropriate spaces on period instruments, performed by top musicians of Seattle playing together with guest artists.” All of which is to say that Nathan has great dedication and talent – but don’t take our word for it, please enjoy exploring more for yourself!


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
Early Music Seattle: Nathan Whittaker


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page
Early Music Seattle: Nathan Whittaker

Selections for July 24, 2020

This week we are highlighting poet Jennifer Bullis. A Nevada native now living in Bellingham, Jennifer has been writing poetry for about twenty years, and taught composition and literature at Whatcom Community College for fourteen years. In 2013 she published Impossible Lessons, a book of poetry that “makes the mythic and the domestic sing,” and Jennifer is certainly immersed in mythology – especially myths of origin, which explain “how we came to be who we are in this place” (something we’d all like to understand right now!). You can go deeper into this with Jennifer in this interview for the Bellingham Review, and read more about Jennifer on her web site here.

Some of Jennifer’s poetry online

Audio: The Summer The Sun Hid

Video: Everett Poetry Nite Presents an Evening with Jennifer Bullis

Text: In That Time of Skiing I was Always Wrong

Jennifer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/bullisjennifer

Selections for July 10 & 17, 2020

One of the joys of compiling the weekly playlist is learning more about the great talents of our performers, who we are delighted to support as well as to share with everyone! This week we are exploring the work of two artists who are contributing their great talent to our For All Our Sisters virtual series:

Aaron Grad is a composer, musician and keen performer on an extraordinary electric theorbo that he designed and built himself. You can read about Aaron’s performance with the instrument in a Seattle Times article here, describing Strange Seasons, an ode to Seattle weather that he performed in 2017 with the Seattle Baroque Orchestra – and enjoy various video and audio recordings on Aaron’s web site here.

Danielle Sampson is a Seattle-based soprano who performs baroque, classical and contemporary music, and has a fascinating catalog of performances spanning the eras. You can read more about Danielle on her website here, and find more of her video and audio recordings here. She is also a founding member of the duo Jarring Sounds with musician Adam Cockerham.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
Early Music Seattle: Aaron Grad and Danielle Sampson


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page
Early Music Seattle: Aaron Grad and Danielle Sampson

Selections for July 3, 2020

Janet See is a flutist of great talent, who is the star of our first videos in the “For all our Sisters” online series – we will have many separate online experiences, instead of one in-person concert. A benefit of the online format is being able to listen again and again, and whenever we wish (while writing these notes, for example!). Janet is a teacher as well as performer, and has soloed for over thirty years on baroque and multi-keyed classical flute, in the USA and UK. You can read more about Janet on her website here.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
Early Music Seattle: Janet See


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Apple Music page
Early Music Seattle: Janet See

Selections for June 19, 2020

You may know that EMS is producing a series of videos to replace the For All Our Sisters concert, which would have taken place this month. One of the amazing performers making that transition from live to digital is Claudia Castro Luna – Washington State’s Poet Laureate and Seattle’s first Civic Poet from 2015-2017, and recipient of the Academy of American Poets Laureate fellowship in 2019.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
Claudia Castro Luna interviews

Selections for June 12, 2020

As we drive towards a brighter and more just future, it’s worth remembering some bright examples from the past. This week we are listening to the work of the “Black Mozart,” Joseph Bologne – an Afro-French violinist and composer from Mozart’s time, who Mozart envied! Also known as “Le Chevalier de Saint-Georges,” or just “Saint-Georges,” Bologne was the son of a French slave. Through hard work as well as genius, Bologne became renowned for classical composition, for mastery of the violin – and for fencing – and ultimately rose to the top of French society. US President John Adams referred to him as “the most accomplished man in Europe.”

Saint-Georges is sometimes described as the first classical composer of African ancestry – although it might be better to say he is the earliest one whose history and work have remained well-known to the present day, because we don’t know what has been lost over time. Perhaps additional classical work by black men and women will come to light as people do more research in this area.

Saint-Georges’ story reads like a novel, and indeed a film was made of his life, “Le Mozart Noir” – you can read about it and purchase the gorgeous soundtrack here, recorded by the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra, with Music Director Emerita Jeanne Lamon and violin soloists Linda Melsted and Geneviève Gilardeau. You can find a detailed history of Joseph Bologne on AfriClassical.com here and on Wikipedia here, and read about him along with other black composers at 9 black composers who changed the course of classical music history.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
NEW:Early Music Seattle: the ‘Black Mozart’ Joseph Bologne


click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW: Early Music Seattle: the ‘Black Mozart’ Joseph Bologne

Selections for June 5, 2020

When we are challenged to know how to think about and respond to what’s happening in the world around us, it can be helpful to go to a source who knows, who is living the experience, and who can explain it in ways that we connect with. This is one of many reasons why Artists and Musicians will always be needed and relevant! This week, we are listening to American singer and musician Rhiannon Giddens. Together with her partner, the composer and musician Francesco Turrisi, they are “creating music that crosses borders and looks forward by looking back.” You can read more about their partnership and subscribe to their work here.

It’s interesting to note that however uncomfortable it can be to engage with the hard events of our times, society will often develop respect and gratitude for the Artists who have done so. Counterculture musician Bob Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature, “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.” Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” is a type of protest song based on a poem by Friedrich Schiller, and to which Beethoven himself added lines that all men are brothers, to make a point.
You can read more about protest songs throughout the world and spanning history, on this Wikipedia page. To quote from the grammy-winning Carolina Chocolate Drops, which Giddens co-founded in 2005: “Know thy history. Let it horrify you; let it inspire you. Let it show you how the future can look, for nothing in this world has not come around before.”


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
NEW: Early Music Seattle: Rhiannon Giddens


Click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW: Early Music Seattle: Rhiannon Giddens

Selections for May 29, 2020

Although women composers from the early centuries may not be as well known as their male counterparts, they were certainly active, with some outstanding music that is still performed today. We are enjoying poignant vocal compositions from a selection of these composers – reminding us why it doesn’t take a full orchestra to give a person the goosebumps!

Caterina Assandra was an Italian composer who was born in 1590 and became a nun in 1609. Her musical talents were recognized from an early age and she composed pieces that were traditional as well as innovative for their time. Learn more about Caterina here.

Hildegard of Bingen, also known as Saint Hildegard or the Sibyl of the Rhine, was a German Benedictine abbess, writer, composer, philosopher, mystic, visionary, and polymath who lived from 1098 until 1179. Learn more about Hildegard here and if you want to go deep into her story, you can find more here.

Kassia, also known as Saint Kassiani, was a Byzantine-Greek writer, poet and composer of hymns. Born around 800 A.D. in Constantinople, she is believed to be the earliest female composer whose works survive. Learn more about Kassia here and here (see that page for links to more women Classical composers).


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
NEW: Early Music Seattle: Early women composers


Click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW: Early Music Seattle: Early women composers

Click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW: Kassia, Byzantine hymns of the first female composer of the Occident 

Selections for May 22, 2020

This week’s playlist features Indian classical music! It is an incredibly ancient form of music from the Indian Subcontinent. Featuring both Hindustani and Carnatic elements, it has very discrete rhythmic components as well as beautiful tonal flows. The playlist comprises of the brilliant artistry of Zakir Hussain on the Tabla, Dr. N. Rajam on the Violin, and Ravi Shankar on the Sitar. All three are world renowned musicians and are greatly influential in the Indian Classical music scene.

For violinists interested in the sliding scales featured in the playlists, here is a great article to read: The Art of the Violin Slide


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
NEW: Indian Early Music


Click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW: Indian Early Music

Selections for May 15, 2020

We are exploring the intersection of Baroque with world and contemporary music, performed by the international ensemble Rumbarroco, led by Laury Gutiérrez of Venezuela. The sonic fusion makes for wonderful listening, and allows us to hear these sounds in exciting new ways. Rumbarroco’s goal is to unite diverse communities by highlighting the fusion and confluence of the cultures of Europe, Africa, and the Americas through musical performances and educational outreach. We are big fans of this mission! You can read more about Rumbarroco on their website here.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
NEW: Rumbarroco – I’ve found a new baby: Baroque meets Afro-Latin Jazz


NEW: La Donna Musicale / RUMBARROCO 


Click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW: Rumbarroco – I’ve found a new baby: Baroque meets Afro-Latin Jazz

Selections for May 8, 2020

Antonio M. Gomez is passionate about connecting learners of all ages with compelling cultural stories and inspiring arts experiences. As a former K-12 teacher, he continues to contribute to economically and culturally accessible education programs at Tacoma Arts Live. As a percussionist, Tony specializes in Afro-Latin, Mediterranean, and Arabic genres. He performs with Trío Guadalevín, the Eurasia Consort, and the national touring music-dance production Tango del Cielo. He has studied in Cuba, Argentina, Panamá, Spain, Italy, and Morocco. Artist Trust awarded Tony a 2018 J.W. Ray Venture Project for Ramas & Raíces – a transnational music project between Mexico and Washington state. He has been a frequent speaker for Humanities Washington on arts and culture and is a Jubilation Foundation Fellow in arts education. Tony holds an MA in education from the University of California, Berkeley and BA from the University of Puget Sound.

We are pleased to present three playlists curated by Tony Gomez himself! Primarily percussion focused, and featuring a wide range of cultural expression, the playlists highlight various artists through their music and commentary. As we’ve listened to them, we’ve found the rhythms accessible and simple, yet deep and soulful. The themes are wonderfully varied and unique, and the YouTube playlist is particularly enjoyable as you can see the artists masterfully play their instruments, dance, and deeply indulge in their musical expression!


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
NEW: Percussion by Antonio M. Gomez


Click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW: Antonio M. Gomez, percussion


NEW: Antonio M. Gomez | Free Listening on SoundCloud

Selections for May 1, 2020

Continuing our theme of wonderful music from around the world, this week we are excited to share a cross-genre selection from Wu Man. Wu is a virtuoso composer and player of the Chinese pipa instrument, a beautiful pear-shaped lute with twenty-six frets and six ‘ridges’ that act as stops along its neck. Wu Man’s work spans a range of styles and genres – Eastern and Western and across the ages. She famously introduced the pipa across genres, playing with the Kronos Quartet and Philip Glass among others, and she is a founding member of The Silk Road Ensemble that commissions works across the musical spectrum. Their “Off the Map” CD was nominated in the Best Classical Crossover Album category at the Grammy Awards in 2011. Musical America named Wu their Instrumentalist of the Year in 2013 – the first time this award was made to a player of a non-Western instrument.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
NEW: Early Music Seattle: Wu Man pipa music


click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW: Early Music Seattle: Wu Man pipa music

click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW: Man Wu

Selections for April 24, 2020

Early spring is transitioning to mid spring and, in some part of the world, late spring! Colorful flowers are in bloom, trees are covered in fresh green, the air is warmer and nice to breathe in, and we are all ready to be outside! We are hopeful that we are past the halfway points of the shutdowns in many areas, and we are more than ready to experience the vernal passions of the season. While we wait, Early Music Seattle is delighted to share a playlist featuring the moving, passionate, energetic works of Alana Youssefian, Antonio M. Gomez, and Miyo Aoki. We are thrilled to work with these greatly talented artists and to share in their vision of what life and beauty can be.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
This Week’s Spotify Selection
NEW: Early Music Seattle: Alana Youssefian


NEW: Listen to percussionist Antonio M. Gomez specializing in Afro-Latin and Mediterranean music


NEW: Watch recorder musician Miyo Aoki as she performs with various artists

Selections for April 17, 2020

This week our playlist features Alexander Weimann, Musical Director of Seattle Baroque Orchestra and Pacific Baroque Orchestra among others. In addition to his Director roles, Alex is a keyboard virtuoso who can improvise within the classical genre – a skill that was expected of musicians in the 18th century, but unusual today. We have selected two of Alex’s Baroque albums, which we are enjoying this week for their sense of structure as well as joy and optimism. “Rebelles baroques” is comprised of Quantz and Telemann concerti for flute, strings and viola, with Alex conducting the Arion Baroque Orchestra. The “Meine Seele” album showcases countertenor Matthew White, with Alex on harpsichord and also directing the Tempo Rubato Ensemble, in a range of rich compositions from Bach, Bernhard, Erlebach, Muffat, Rosenmüller, Schütz and Tunder.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
NEW:
 Early Music Seattle: Baroque with Alexander Weimann


Click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW:  Early Music Seattle: Baroque with Alexander Weimann

Selections for April 10, 2020

We are pleased to highlight the world-class talents of the Seattle Baroque Orchestra in this week’s playlist, focusing on their “Antonio Vivaldi” album. Vivaldi was known in his lifetime for violin pyrotechnics and clever composition, and these are superbly carried by Ingrid Matthews (violin), Byron Schenkman (harpsichord), Tekla Cunningham (violin), John Lenti (theorbo) and Nathan Whittaker (cello). Do we react differently to Vivaldi’s music today than listeners did in his own time? We may be uplifted, excited, soothed – but surely delighted to lose ourselves in Baroque splendor while cocooning at home!


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page.
NEW:
Early Music Seattle: Chamber works


Click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW:  Early Music Seattle: Chamber works 

Selections for April 3, 2020

This week’s playlist reflects the Celtic traditions of Europe. Cultures can become especially vibrant when different traditions influence one another, and this is true of the Celtic areas in Europe, which share common sea routes – the British regions of Wales, Scotland, Cornwall and the Isle of Man, Brittany in France, the island of Ireland, Portugal, and Spanish Galicia. Many a fascinating hour can be spent in learning about individual interpretations – for example, bagpipes are a famous part of Celtic traditional music, however they have varying sounds and mechanics (for example, Scottish bagpipes are breath-powered, while Irish Uilleann pipes are bellows-blown by squeezing under the arm). Celtic music is a living tradition and performed by communities in multiple ways, from spontaneous pub music sessions to tradition-inspired orchestral pieces in Concert Halls, however the underlying music is essentially the same. We hope you’re enjoy the differences as well as common threads in this week’s selection.


Click on above image to connect to Early Music Seattle’s Spotify page
NEW:
Early Music Seattle: Celtic Traditions


Click image to see our profile and follow us
NEW: Early Music Seattle: Celtic traditions