VIEW

Sat. 15 May. 2021

7: 00 PM

Accademia del Piacere

Lamentum

No charge performance | Suggested donation &20

Conceived a few months before the coronavirus pandemic ravaged the world, this program by Accademia del Piacere serves as a tribute to its victims as a reminder that much more devastating epidemics and calamities—speaking in social terms—have been commonplace in the world for centuries.

The authors of our program knew them intimately: Correa de Arauxo experienced the Atlantic plague in Seville in 1599, where he studied composition with Alonso Lobo, who himself saw the disease pass through Toledo. It is there where he wrote the poignant Versa est in luctum for the funeral of Philip II, who died in 1598 At the same time Matthias Weckmann in Hamburg and Dietrich Buxtehude in Lubeck suffered the havoc of the terrible Thirty Year War.

Mogavero witnessed the decline of his decimated Venice. The presentation of his Lamentations is a first recreation in modern times of this work. Four centuries since its composition, humanity still contends with the feelings of pain brought about by the devastation of war, the inspiration of the biblical texts twenty-six centuries old, which transcend time and geographical space.

Translation by Raúl Sánchez, Seattle, 2021

 

Raúl is the current City of Redmond Poet Laureate. He teaches poetry in Spanish through the Seattle Arts and Lectures (WITS) program, also through the Jack Straw Educational Project. In the last three years he volunteered for PONGO Teen Writing at the Juvenile Detention Center. Recently, he translated Ellen Ziegler’s book for the Museum of Antique Mexican Toys located in Mexico City. His forthcoming second collection “When There Were No Borders” will be released Spring 2021 from Flower Song Books, McAllen Texas.

www.rsancheztlaltecatl.com

https://www.seattletimes.com/pacific-nw-magazine/sept-13-sketcher/

www.picturesofpoets.com/poets/raul-sanchez/

https://moonpathpress.com

 

 

 
 

Program

Program Notes

The Lamentations of Jeremiah by Antonio Mogavero, a work expressly rescued and transcribed for this concert, will be the center of this tribute, and will have its first performance in modern times. We know very little of Mogavero, little comes to us through history. Currently we know that he worked in Spain after having seen the decline of his decimated Venice, one of many cities hit by tragedy in the Seventeenth Century. Halfway between the Renaissance and the optimistic Age of Enlightenment, the Sixteenth Century in Europe was a period strongly marked by economic crises, pestilence, famines and constant wars, ending the lives of a high percentage of the population and any illusion happiness for the rest of the people. Geoffrey Parker, Hispanic scholar and renowned specialist in modern history, has called it “the cursed century” in one of his most important bibliographic contributions. Whether or not you agree with this assessment, it was certainly a time marked by devastation which crossed the continent with an intensity that not even the current experience of the Covid-19 allows us to conceive.

This desolation marked both the material and cultural conditions for the musicians active at the time, inspiring lyrics and affections to the music itself, particularly the religious works, from which the survivors of such calamities sought comfort. The authors of our program lived them intimately: Correa de Arauxo encountered the Atlantic plague in Seville in 1599 where he studied composition with Alonso Lobo, who himself had seen the disease pass through Toledo when he was chapel master. This was where he wrote the poignant Versa est in luctum for the funeral of Philip II, who died in 1598.

Matthias Weckmann in Hamburg and Dietrich Buxtehude in Lubeck suffered the havoc of the terrible Thirty Years War, but the composer most struck by the calamities of this German religious conflict was Weckmann’s teacher, Heinrich Schütz, who suffered many personal losses during his long life, including the damages suffered by his chapel in Dresden, the storied Staatskapelle. Schütz saw it was necessary to adjust his music to condensed forms because of these privations. We will hear two examples of this taken from his books of Small Spiritual Concerts (1636 and 1639). Both Weckmann and Mogavero use the section Wie liegt die Stadt so w'ste (How is the city so deserted? ), from Jeremiah's Lamentations. Four centuries since its composition, humanity has not been able to move past the feelings of pain brought by the devastation of war, which was the inspiration for these biblical texts twenty-six centuries ago that transcend both time and geographical space.

Translation by Raúl Sánchez, Seattle, 2021

Program

LAMENTUM
Funeral musics, sounds of war and elegies for devastation

Accademia del Piacere
Fahmi Alqhai

Hana Blazíková soprano
Gabriel Díaz altus
Ariel Hernández tenor
Javier Jiménez Cuevas bass

Fahmi Alqhai quinton & musical direction

Mariarosaria D’Aprile violin
Johanna Rose viola da gamba
Christoph Urbanetz viola da gamba
Rami Alqhai violone
Javier Núñez positive organ
---

O Lux Beata Trinitas
Preambulum
Matthias Weckmann (ca. 1616-1674)
Eile mich, Gott, zu erretten
Heinrich Schütz (1585-1672)
Toccata ex D
Matthias Weckmann
Canzonetta g-moll BuxWV 173
Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707)
Ist Gott für uns
Heinrich Schütz

Tiento on “Batalla de Morales”
Francisco Correa de Arauxo (1584-1664)
Versa est in luctum
Alonso Lobo (1555-1617)
Lamentations of Jeremiah
Antonio Mogavero (1550-1664)

Wie liegt die Stadt so wüste
Matthias Weckmann
Ciacona e-moll BuxWV 160
Dietrich Buxtehude
Der Tod ist verschlungen
Matthias Weckmann

Idea and adaptations: Fahmi Alqhai and Juan Ramón Lara
Musicological study: Carlos González Ludeña

Poem - Dark Earth

Dark Earth

Out of the dark and into the blue
Early light startles my sleepy mind,
Storms, earthquakes, toxic air, the sky no longer blue.

Sound of falling trees without a clue
Amazed and surprised to find,
Out of the dark and into the blue.

Mud slides, disaster, and death for more than a few.
God sent destruction to wipe out the humankind,
Storms, earthquakes, toxic air, the sky no longer blue.

Mother Earth surprised us, no one knew.
Soon will be our turn to find,
Out of the dark and into the blue.

Our lives darkened and no longer in the hue,
Slowly, the planet will come into a grind.
Storms, earthquakes, toxic air, the sky no longer blue.

Everything, every-thing all things will be askew,
A barren planet left behind,
Out of the dark and into the blue
Storms, earthquakes, toxic air, the sky no longer blue.

Raúl Sánchez

Vocal Text

Oh Jehovah, may you deliver me;
Jehovah, hurry to my rescue.
Those confused and embarrassed
Those who seek to destroy my life.
Go back and be ashamed
Those who wish me evil;
May devastation be the payment of your affront
Those who say to me: !Ea, ea!
Rejoice and relish within you all who seek you,
And those who always say they love your salvation:
Jehovah may be praised.
Even though I’m afflicted and needy,
The Lord will think of me.
You are my help and my liberator;
Oh, my God, don't delay.

If God is with us, who is against us?
He who did not spared his own Son, but gave him to all of us,
Wouldn’t he give us all things along with him?
Who will be the accuser of the chosen ones? God is the judge.
Who will be the one convicting us? Christ is the one who died.
Moreover, he is the resurrected one, the one who is on the side of God,
the one who intercedes for us.

My mourning harp changed,
And my flute is the voice of the mourners.
Bore me: I must not live forever,
Leave me, for my days are in vain.

The Lamentations of the Prophet Jeremiah

Aleph.
!How empty the populous city has become, lonely and abandoned!
The greatest among all nations has become a widow,
The lady of the provinces became a taxpayer.

Beth.
Bitterly she cries at night, and her tears remain on her cheeks.
Among all her lovers, there isn’t anyone to comfort her;
All her friends abandoned her, they became enemies.

Gimel.
Judah has gone into captivity caused by the affliction and the harsh servitude;
She lived among the nations, and found no rest;
All her pursuers reached her amongst her shudders.

Daleth.
The roads of Sión are in mourning, for there is no one coming to the solemn feasts;
All their doors are devastated, their priests are sobbing,
Their virgins are afflicted, and she is filled with bitterness.

Jerusalem, turn to the Lord your God.

Death is drowned in victory.
Oh death, where is your sting? Oh, sepulcher, where is your victory?
Many thanks may be given to God, who gives us victory through Jesus Christ, our Lord.
Hallelujah.

 
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